スポンサーサイト

 --------
上記の広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。
新しい記事を書く事で広告が消せます。
カテゴリ :スポンサー広告 トラックバック(-) コメント(-)

それぞれの災害の傷跡

 2012-02-21
telegraph_logo1.jpg


The aftershocks still hitting Japan
余震の続く日本


One year after the tsunami, the Fukushima 50 speak for the first time, while a mother who spent days searching for her son tells why the scars remain
津波から1年。フクシマ50が始めて語り、何日間も息子を探した母親が、なぜ傷跡が残っているのかを話す


By Danielle Demetriou in Japan and Nick Meo

7:00AM GMT 19 Feb 2012

Wrapped in a beige blanket and surrounded by sea-soaked debris, broken homes and smashed cars, Yuko Sugimoto had only one thing on her mind: how to find her four-year-old son. She had not seen him for more than 24 hours, since the tsunami had swamped almost half of the city of Ishinomaki in northeastern Japan - with her son’s kindergarten among the submerged buildings.
ベージュの毛布に包まり、海水につかった瓦礫、崩壊した家、つぶされた車に囲まれ、スギモト・ユウコさんの心の中にあったのは、たった1つのことでした。どうやって、4歳の息子を見つけるのか。津波が日本の東北、石巻市のほぼ半分を水没させてから24時間以上会っていなかったのです。彼女の息子の幼稚園は、水没した建物の中の一つでした。


As Mrs Sugimoto’s eyes scanned the wreckage of her hometown, her haunting expression was captured by a photographer who she does not recall seeing. The result was an iconic image of the earthquake and tsunami that devastated Japan on March 11 last year, published in newspapers and magazines around the world.
スギモトさんの目は、破壊された故郷を見つめていました。その忘れられない表情は、彼女が覚えていない写真家によって捕らえられていました。その写真は、去年3月11日に日本を荒廃させた地震と津波の象徴像となりました。


japan_1877438c.jpg


Mrs Sugimoto was among the fortunate. Despite a harrowing three-day ordeal, she was eventually reunited with her son, Raito, at an evacuation centre.
スギモトさんは、幸運だった人の一人です。3日間の苦しい体験にもかかわらず、最終的に、息子、ライト君と避難所で再会したのです。


Others were not so lucky. Nearly 6,000 people in the region were listed as killed or missing after the sea travelled miles inland into Ishinomaki, one of the worst hit communities in the disaster; overall in Japan, some 16,000 died and nearly 4,000 are still missing.
他の人はそのように幸運ではありませんでした。海水が石巻の内陸へ何マイルも押し寄せた後で、その地域の、ほぼ6000人の死亡、行方不明が、確認されました。その地域を襲った、最悪の災害の1つです。日本全体で、1万5000名が死亡し、ほぼ4000名がまだ行方不明のままです。


As the first anniversary of the disaster approaches, the photograph has lost none of its power - and despite the painful memories it evokes, Mrs Sugimoto is hopeful it will serve as a reminder of the tragedy to the outside world.
その災害から最初の1年が経過しようとしても、その写真の力は失われていません。つらい記憶が呼び起こされるにも関わらず、スギモトさんは、海外に向けて、その悲劇を思い出させることに役立つのではないかと、希望を持っています。


“When I look at it now, it reminds me of all the troubles we’ve had over the past year,” she says. “But I hope that when people see the picture, it will remind them of the tsunami and make sure they don’t forget what happened and what still needs to be done.”
「今その写真を見ると、去年抱えていた全ての問題を思い出します。」と彼女は言います。「でも、人々がこの写真を見て、津波のことを思い出し、何が起こったのか、まだ成されなければならないことが何なのかを、忘れないようにしてくれます。」


With her bright smile and stylish clothes, Mrs Sugimoto, 29, appears to be a different person from the one in the photograph: but beneath her friendly facade, it is clear that the last year changed the lives of her family.
彼女(スギモトさん-29)の明るい笑顔と流行の洋服からは、その写真とは違う人物のように見えます。しかし、その人懐こい表情の奥に、去年(の出来事)が彼女の家族の生活を変えたことは明らかに分かります。


afplivefour276647-508648506.jpg



The home she built four years ago with her husband Harunori, 39, was destroyed in the tsunami, which swept away along with their pet dog and their personal belongings.
4年前に夫、ハルノリさん(39)と立てたマイホームは津波で破壊され、ペットの犬と、他の所有物と一緒に流されました。


For months after the disaster, the family lived in shared accommodation with other survivors provided by her husband’s company before renting a friend’s house.
災害後何ヶ月もの間、友人の家を借りるまで、彼女の夫の会社が提供してくれた共同宿泊施設に他の生存者と暮らしていました。


Serving tea in their new home -surrounded by snow-covered rice fields - she says: “We were lucky. We may have lost our home but my family has become even more precious to me. Perhaps we took things for granted a little before the disaster.”
新しい家-雪に覆われた田んぼに囲まれていますが-でお茶をもてなしながら、彼女はこういいます。「私たちは幸運でした。家を失ったかもしれませんが、自分の家族は、今までになく貴重なものになりました。多分、災害の前は、家族を少し当然のことのように思っていたのです。」


It was shortly after lunchtime that the earthquake struck, just as Mrs Sugimoto, a drinks company employee, was getting into her car to visit a customer.
地震が起こったのは、昼食時のすぐ後でした。飲料会社の従業員、スギモトさんが、顧客を訪問するため、車に乗り込んだそのときでした。


“The earthquake came before I switched on the engine,” she recalls, speaking quietly as her son plays with the new family dog. “It went on for a very long time. I was worried the car might turn over, it was such a strong quake.
「エンジンをかける前に地震がきました。」と、息子が新しいペットの犬と遊んでいるときに、スギモトさんは思い出し、静かに話します。


“When it stopped, my first thought was that I must pick up my son. I was on the opposite side of the city, but I thought he must be feeling scared at the kindergarten after such a big earthquake.”
「地震が止まったとき、最初に思ったことは、息子を迎えに行かなければならない、ということでした。私は市の反対側にいましたが、息子が、きっと大きな地震の後、幼稚園で怖い思いをしているに違いないと思ったのです。」


Straight away, she began driving back into town, taking numerous shortcuts to avoid heavy traffic, broken bridges and large riverside waves.
まっしぐらに、車で町中に引き返し始め、渋滞、壊れた橋、川沿いの大波を避けるため、数々の抜け道を行きました。


At one point she bumped into colleagues who urged her to turn around due to the tsunami warning - but she continued. “All I could think about was my son and how I could get to him. But I just couldn’t get to the kindergarten. It was impossible to get across town.”
ある時点で、津波警告が出ているので、引き返すように促がす同僚とでくわしましたが、彼女は進み続けました。「私が考えられることは、息子と、どうやったら息子のところにたどり着けるのか、と言うことだけでした。でも、ただ、幼稚園に行くことができなかったのです。町を渡ることは不可能でした。」


As the tsunami swept into Ishinomaki, Mrs Sugimoto was still stuck further inland in traffic-clogged streets.
石巻を津波が一撃したとき、スギモトさんはまだ車がつかえた、はるか内陸で身動きが取れなかったなのです。


Then she received a message from her husband, working in another part of the city, confirming her worst fears: “He said the kindergarten area had been fully flooded and the building was under water.”
そのとき、市内の違う場所で働いている夫から、メッセージが届きました。それは、彼女の最悪の恐れを確実にするものでした。「幼稚園のあたりは完全に洪水になり、建物は水の下だと。」


With flooded streets and debris blocking pathways, there was no way for Mrs Sugimoto to proceed into town to try to find her son, reach her husband, or return to their home, which was also under water. As a result, she spent a sleepless night in the car near an shopping area, with no electricity or phone service, trying not to think the worst.
水に沈んだ道と瓦礫が行く手を阻み、スギモトさんが、息子を探しに行き、夫のところに行く、あるいは家に戻る術はありませんでした。そこも水の下だったのです。結果として、彼女は商店街の近くで、車の中で、眠れない夜を過ごしました。電気も電話も通じていなく、最悪のことを考えないようにしていました。


“It was a very tough night. I didn’t know what had happened to the rest of my family. I found out after that my parents’ house had also been destroyed. But at that point, I was only thinking about my son. I didn’t sleep at all.”
「とてもつらい夜でした。家族に何が起こったのかわからなかったのです。後で、両親の家の崩壊したと知りました。でもそのときは、自分の息子のことだけを考えていました。一睡もできませんでした。」


At sunrise, she continued her search, abandoning her car to venture further into the disaster zone on foot -before she bumped into her husband.
夜が明けて、彼女は探し続けました。車を乗り捨て、被災地区に更に徒歩で進みました。そして、彼女の夫に出くわしたのです。


There followed two days of searching. It was during this fraught time that a photographer from a Japanese newspaper captured Mrs Sugimoto’s image, as she scanned the wreckage in the hope that she might find some clue to Raito’s whereabouts.
更に2日間探索の日が続きました。日本の新聞社の写真がスギモトさんの姿を捉えたのは、その不安の時を過ごしている間でした。彼女が、息子ライト君の居所に何か手がかりを探せるかもしれないと望みを託しながら、瓦礫の残骸を見つめていたときです。


“I was waiting for news about Raito from some other mothers and also my husband when the picture must have been taken. Someone must have given me a blanket, it was very, very cold. But I have no memory of the photograph being taken.”
「その写真を撮られたのは、他のお母さんと夫から、レイトの知らせを待っていた時に違いありません。誰かが私に毛布をくれたはずです。とても、とても寒かったのです。でも、写真を撮られたことは全く覚えていません。」


It was not until sunset the following day that she and her husband tracked Raito down: he and his young classmates had been evacuated from the rooftop of his kindergarten to a university by Self-Defence Force troops.
翌日の日暮れになって、彼女は夫とレイト君を見つけたのです。レイト君はクラスメイトと幼稚園の屋根の上から、大学へ、自衛隊員によって避難させれていました。


“I read the list of evacuated names at the entrance three or four times as I couldn’t believe it was him at first. When we finally found the classroom he was staying in and saw him across the room, I couldn’t move. Tears were in my eyes and I couldn’t see a thing. I was just crying with relief.
「入り口で避難させられた人の名前のリストを3回か4回見直しました。最初、それが自分の息子だと信じられなかったのです。やっと息子がいる教室を見つけ、その姿を教室の向こうに見たとき、身動きができませんでした。目から涙が流れ、良く見えなかったのです。ただ、安心のあまり泣いていました。」


“I found out afterwards that Raito had not cried at all during those days, he appeared quite empty of emotions and hadn't spoken at all. But when I held him for the first time, he cried a little.”
「その後、ライトが最近ずっと泣いていないことに気がつきました。感情がなくなってしまったようで、全く話もしませんでした。でも、私が抱きしめると、初めてライトは、少しだけ泣きました。」




Eighty-five miles south of Ishinomaki is Fukushima, site of the nuclear power plant that provided many more indelible images of the disaster.
石巻から137km南にいくと、福島です。更にぬぐいきれない災害のイメージを与えた原子発電所の現場です。


Four days after the tsunami, Japan’s Prime Minister Naoto Kan addressed a team of frightened nuclear engineers at the plant.
津波から4日後、日本の菅直人主相は、発電所で驚愕している原子力技術者たちのチームに話をしました。


With cooling systems failing in the reactor cores, meltdown had begun and radiation levels were rising. The engineers’ employer, Tepco, was proposing to abandon the plant. The government stopped them, arguing that it could lead to a huge cloud of radioactivity that would force tens of millions of Japanese people to abandon their homes.
原子炉の冷却システムが損なわれ、メルトダウンが始まり、放射線レベルが上昇していました。技術者たちの雇用主、東電は、発電所をを立ち去ることを提案していました。政府はそれをやめさせ、そんなことをすれば、放射性物質の巨大な雲のため、何千万人もの人々が家を立ち退かなければならないことになる、と議論していたのです。


Speaking by videophone from Tepco’s Tokyo headquarters, Mr Kan told the engineers: “This is a very tough situation but you cannot abandon the plant. The fate of Japan hangs in the balance. All those over 60 should be prepared to lead the way in a dangerous place. Otherwise we are handing Japan over to an invisible enemy.”
東電本社からのビデオ電話で、菅氏は技術者たちに告げました。「とても困難な状況だが、原発を放棄することはできない。日本の運命がかかっている。60歳以上の人は、危険な場所へ向かう準備をするように。そうでなければ、日本は、目に見えない敵の手に渡ることになる。」


Until now those engineers -known as the Fukushima 50 -have not spoken about the days they spent nursing the plant back from the brink of disaster.
その技術者たち-フクシマ50として知られていますが-は、これまで、災害の瀬戸際から発電所を管理下に戻そうとしていた日々について、話をしませんでした。


They have been praised as heroes but forbidden from speaking by Tepco, which has been subjected to withering criticism for its role in the disaster.
彼らはヒーローとして讃えられましたが、この災害における役割について、痛烈な批判の対象となっている東電から口止めされていのです。


BBC researchers spent eight months persuading them to talk on camera, for a This World programme, revealing how close Japan came to total disaster.
BBCの調査員は、8ヶ月にわたり、彼らにカメラに向かって、「This World」番組のために話すように説得し続けました。日本が、最悪の災害に至るに、どれだけ近かったのかを明かすために。


Some admit they thought of escaping, terrified of an agonising death from radiation poisoning. Others described the improvisations they used when safety plans failed, and the risks they took working in heavily irradiated areas of the plant - entering in relays for no more than 17 minutes at a time to limit their exposure.
何人かは、逃げようと思ったと認めます。放射能に毒されて、酷く苦しんで死んでいくのが恐ろしかったのです。又他の者は、安全計画が失敗したとき、彼らが使用した即興のことについて、発電所の放射性のとても高い場所-被曝を制限するための1回に17分以下で交代で入るところ-で働く事で犯した危険について話しました。


One who spoke on film was Takashi Sato, a reactor inspector. He recalls: “In the control room, people were saying we were finished. They were saying it quietly - but they were saying it. We felt we had to flee.”
このフィルムで話をした人の1人は、サトウ・タカシさんで、原子炉検査員です。彼は思い起こします。「制御室では、皆、もう終わった、と言っていました。とても静かに、そう言っていました。でも、確かに、そう言っていたのです。自分たちは、逃げなければならない、と感じていました。」


article-0-0B4D31D400000578-899_634x432.jpg


This was when the prime minister made his video-phone appeal. Mr Kan told the filmmakers: “I thought withdrawal is out of the question. If they withdrew, six reactors and seven fuel pools would be abandoned. Everything melts down. Radiation ten times worse than Chernobyl will be scattered.”
総理大臣がビデオ電話で訴えたときです。菅氏は、監督に言いました。「退去は問題外だと思った。もし退去したら、6つの原子炉と7つの燃料プールが放置される。全てがメルトダウンする。チェルノブイリの10倍の放射能が撒き散らされる。」


He believed it would effectively have been the end of Japan.
彼は、それが、実質的に日本の終わりになる、と確信したのです。


Water-bombing the stricken plant from army helicopters was then attempted. The pilots knew that Soviet aircrew who had done this at Chernobyl later died of cancer.
そして軍のヘリコプターから、崩壊した発電所に水を投げかける試みがなされました。操縦士は、ソビエトの航空機搭乗員がチェルノブイリで同じ事をして、後に癌で死んだ事を知っていました。


But the wind was too strong for accuracy, and by now the US government was secretly planning to evacuate 90,000 citizens from Japan.
しかし、正確に落とすためには風が強すぎ、アメリカ政府は、ひそかに日本から9万人の市民を非難させる計画を立てていました。


What finally worked was Tokyo firefighters spraying sea water into the plant, showing great bravery. They had no training to deal with nuclear disasters, and weren’t sure how much radioactivity they were being exposed to.
最終的に功をきたしたのは、東京の消防士たちが、偉大な勇敢さを示し、発電所に海水を浴びせたことでした。彼らは原子力災害の取り扱い方の訓練を一切受けていませんでした。そして、どのくらい被曝したのか定かではありませんでした。
 

The engineers now had a chance to get a constant flow of water to the reactor cores. Hundreds of workers who had been on standby laid pipes, working fast in case radiation levels spiked again. They didn’t know where the most dangerous radiation hotspots were.
技術者たちは今、炉心に常に水を流す込む事が出来ました。何百人もの作業員がパイプを敷くのにスタンバイしていました。放射線レベルが再び急上昇する場合を考えすばやく作業していたのです。彼らは、どこにもっとも危険なホットスポットがあるのか知りませんでした。


“It was an emergency operation and we were in a hurry,” one said. “No one complained, we all understood. Even if it broke the rules, we kept quiet about it. I felt the weight of Japan’s future on my shoulders. I felt that I had to carry the flag of Japan.”
「それは緊急作業で、急いでいたのです。」と一人が言いました。「誰も文句は言いませんでした。皆分かっていたのです。たとえ規則を破っても、その事については黙っているのだと。日本の未来の重さが、自分の肩にかかっているのを感じました。日本の旗を持たなければならないのだと感じていたのです。」


full_1300909783fukushima50.jpg


Nearly a year later, the company and the nuclear power industry have been widely questioned. What saved Japan when all the safety systems and back-up plans failed was the bravery of men who stayed at their posts, under the leadership of the plant manager, Masao Yoshida.
およそ1年後、電力会社と、原子力業界は、広く疑問視されています。全ての安全システムとバックアッププランが失敗したとき、発電所所長、ヨシダ・マサオ氏のリーダーシップのもと、勇敢な男たちが持ち場を離れなかった事が、日本を救いました。


As one engineer says: “If Mr Yoshida hadn’t been there it would have been the end, I think.”
ある技術者は言います。「ヨシダ氏が居なかったら、おしまいだったと思う。」



Meanwhile, in Ishinomaki, signs of the tsunami are becoming less visible: gone are the mountains of tsunami detritus, muddy scattered belongings and overturned cars.
一方、石巻では、津波の爪あとが少しずつ消えています。残骸、泥まみれになって散らばった所持品、ひっくり返った車の山はなくなりました。


Scars, however, remain: in place of the debris, there are vast swathes of cleared, flat concrete close to the seafront, areas once packed with homes and businesses but today uninhabitable.
しかし、傷跡は残っています。瓦礫置き場では、全て流された広大なコンクリートの平地が海岸通に広がっています。そのあたりは、かつて家やビジネスがひしめき合っていましたが、今では住めなくなっています。


Long-term reconstruction is the next phase, a situation replicated in countless coastal regions, with the focus shifting from emergency aid to finding funds to build new communities, with new housing, businesses and job opportunities.
長期に渡る復興、数え切れないほどの海岸地域の再生が次の段階です。焦点は、緊急救援から、新しい地域の建設ための基金調達へと移行しています。新しい家、ビジネス、そして仕事の機会です。


For many, the Sugimotos included, the emotional scars will take longer to heal. “Raito has been very anxious since March 11 last year,” says Mrs Sugimoto. “At first, he vomited whenever he heard an earthquake or tsunami warning sound and he still doesn’t like dark places. He looks fine on the surface but there are troubles at the bottom of his heart.”
スギモトさんは、心の傷は癒えるには長くかかるのだろう、とも言いました。「ライトは去年の3月11日以来とても不安がります。最初は地震や津波の警報の音を聞くたび、吐いていました。そして、今でも暗い所が嫌いです。表面的には大丈夫に見えて、心の底に問題を抱えているのです。」


The iconic tsunami photograph, however, has proven to be a beacon of hope: “At first I didn’t like all the attention that came with the photograph, it made me feel uncomfortable,” says Mrs Sugimoto, who travelled to France last year for a photography festival as a result of the image.
しかしながら、偶像的な津波の写真は、希望の指針となりました。「最初は、全ての注目がその写真に集まるのがいやでした。とても居心地悪く感じたのです。」この写真の結果として去年フランスへ写真祭のために訪れたスギモトさんは言います。


“Now I’m very happy that the photograph was used and that it potentially stimulated aid and support from other countries around the world.”
「今では、その写真が使われた事を嬉しく思います。世界中のほかの国からの救援や支援を促せるかもしれないのです。」


'This World. Inside the Meltdown’ is on BBC 2, 9pm, Thursday
「This World メルトダウンの内側」は、BBC2にて木曜日午後9時に放映されます。

そのビデオクリップは、こちら

Picture1_20120224105907.jpg

400マイクロシーベルト。問題なし!


Picture2_20120224105907.jpg

今いくつ?

70ミリシーベルト!


Picture3_20120224105907.jpg

ここ、100ミリシーベルト!

100ミリシーベルト!!


Picture4_20120224105906.jpg

作業をしてないもの。

トラックに退去!!







自然災害は、

人間に止める事は出来ません。



人間が自ら作り出した、原子力の引き起こす悲劇は、

人間に止める事が出来ます。



それとも、

まだ、

原子力爆弾や、核実験や、原子力発電所の事故などで、

目に見えないあらゆる放射性物質に怯え、苦しんだ人の数が

その危険を放棄するのに、

少なすぎるというのでしょうか?


スポンサーサイト

トラックバック
トラックバックURL:
http://bluedolphine.blog107.fc2.com/tb.php/683-a9fbca55

コメント











管理者にだけ表示を許可する
≪ トップページへこのページの先頭へ  ≫
地球の名言Ⅱ

presented by 地球の名言

プロフィール

Blue Dolphine

Author:Blue Dolphine
ボア君 21歳
(いのしし年生まれ)
ラビ君 18歳
(うさぎ年生まれ)
エリー 9歳
(ラブラドール犬 ♀)

と連れ合いに、そして周りの全ての人たちから日々幸せをもらっている母です。

バンクーバー近郊に被曝からの避難を考えている方、できる範囲でお手伝いします。遠慮なくご連絡ください。




にほんブログ村 海外生活ブログ カナダ情報へ
にほんブログ村

にほんブログ村 環境ブログ 原発・放射能へ
にほんブログ村

にほんブログ村 犬ブログ ラブラドールへ
にほんブログ村

メールフォーム

名前:
メール:
件名:
本文:

最新コメント
最新記事
カテゴリ
カレンダー
10 | 2017/11 | 12
- - - 1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 - -

月別アーカイブ
全記事表示リンク
最新トラックバック
上記広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。新しい記事を書くことで広告を消せます。